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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this podcast, recorded as part of the Leadership in Turbulent...

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    In this podcast, recorded as part of the Leadership in Turbulent Times conference on March 22, members of the Hall of Fame and 20 Under 35 answer questions about leading people, projects and companies through the first global pandemic of the space and satellite age, and the long recovery from it. The panel was moderated by SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla and featured the following speakers:

    In 2011, Steve Collar became CEO of O3b Networks, the company founded four years earlier by Hall of Famer Greg Wyler. The impact of his leadership soon made itself felt. Within two years, the company launched the first four satellites of its pioneering MEO constellation and added another eight the following year, and later bringing the number of O3b satellites launched to 20 in 2019. By 2016, O3b Networks had built a firm backlog of $350 million with more than $100 million in current-year revenue, making it the fastest-growing satellite operator in history. SES was one of the company’s early investors and, in 2016, exercised its option to acquire O3b Networks. The deal created the first communications satellite operator with spacecraft in both GEO and MEO orbits. Steve was appointed CEO of SES Networks, the newly-formed data-centric business unit of SES, in May 2017. Steve Collar was inducted into the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2019. Read More 

    Jim Oliver is an inventor and entrepreneur with a proven record of achievement in ground segment technology. He has made major contributions to freeing satellite ground systems from fixed locations throughout his career, from his work at SatCom Technologies—where he led the introduction of innovative technologies for fixed and truck-mounted antennas—to the creation at AvL of high-accuracy pointing technologies for small portable antennas for commercial and military use. Jim’s technological contributions have greatly expanded the applications for satellite communications in ways that save lives and expand opportunities for millions. Jim Oliver was inducted into the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021. Read More

    Brittany Zajic is a natural disaster research scientist turned businesswoman. She brings 6 years of geospatial industry experience to Planet, working across both public and private sectors, including several years in the Earth Science Division at NASA. In her current role at Planet, she manages the Disaster Data Program, providing first responders access to Planet imagery in the event of large disaster events to accelerate humanitarian and disaster response. As a member of the business development team, she is also responsible for the development of key partnerships and research of new markets that will help the company achieve target objectives. Brittany Zajic was a member of the 20 Under 35 cohort in 2020 and a Promise Award winner. Read More

     Zackary Downey began his career working in data visualization and applied economics. After graduating with a double bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Economics from Boston College, he joined Ursa as a Data Scientist and Product Developer in 2016. During his time at Ursa, Zackary developed and has helped market the world’s first commercial data subscription product based on radar satellite data. His product—a powerful but easy-to-use weekly report on the world’s oil storage based on commercial satellite radar imaging data—is sold to leading commodity traders, banks and hedge funds. While creating Ursa’s oil storage reports, Zackary has led a multi-disciplinary team in product development and production, including image analysis and supply-chain management. Zachary Downey was a member of the 20 Under 35 cohort in 2018. Read More

     

          

     

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Craig Clark, Founder and CSO of AAC Clyde Space. Craig talks about his career path and the challenges of building a successful small satellite company from the ground up.

    After graduating with a BE in Electrical Power Engineering from the University of Glasgow, Craig Clark began his career at Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd., where he served as Power Systems Team Leader. After 11 years at Surrey Satellite Technology, he returned to Glasgow and founded Clyde Space Ltd. in October 2005. Clyde Space launched Scotland's first satellite in 2014 and has established itself as one of the most successful suppliers of small satellites in the world. In January 2018, Clyde Space merged with Swedish listed company AAC Microtec, and the combined company continues to grow and develop cutting-edge products for the small satellite market, particularly in the area of cubesats. In June 2013, Craig was awarded an MBE in the Queen's birthday Honours list for his services to Innovation and Technology and, in 2017, Clyde Space won the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the Innovation Category. He served as a member of the UK Space Leadership Council from 2010 to 2016, providing advice to the UK Space Agency on its work plan and future opportunities. Craig is a member of the Council of Economic Advisors to the Scottish Government and has served in that position since 2018.

     

          

     

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zimmerman, Principal Investigator and Aerospace...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zimmerman, Principal Investigator and Aerospace Engineer at Paragon Space Development and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Brittany shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Brittany Zimmerman has spent 30 years working on expanding her breadth of skills to build a synergy of competencies to achieve her lifetime goal: organizational success through bettering the conditions of humanity.  She takes the old philosophy of leaving the world a better place than you found it to the next level. In her most recent of many ventures, Brittany is implementing her multidisciplinary expertise of space systems to simplify complexities and make life support technologies easily accessible and affordable for terrestrial humanity. For this and other projects, she is seeking partners and investors.

    To continually diversify her activities and skills, she has opened a new location to a 501(c)(3) where she acts as Board Member and Director of Operations for a nonprofit which ensures safety and education to cross-cultural youth in California and Arizona. Brittany joined Paragon Space Development as an Aerospace Systems Engineer in 2016 after completing two internships at IEWC and Rockwell Automation as well as serving as an Aerospace Systems Engineer at Rockwell Collins, where she worked on design and architecture of the Bombardier Global cockpit system. She also worked as a Research Assistant while studying at the University of North Dakota (UND), where she developed plant conveyer cycles in closed-loop life support systems intended for long-duration spaceflight and a greenhouse module for the NASA Inflatable Lunar/Martian Habitat. Brittany was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year.  Learn more about Brittany.

     

       

     

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    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zajic, Business Development and Disaster Response...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zajic, Business Development and Disaster Response Operations Lead at Planet and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Brittany shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Brittany is a natural disaster research scientist turned businesswoman. She brings 6 years of geospatial industry experience to Planet, working across both public and private sectors, including several years in the Earth Science Division at NASA. In her current role at Planet, she manages the Disaster Data Program, providing first responders access to Planet imagery in the event of large disaster events to accelerate humanitarian and disaster response. As a member of the business development team, she is also responsible for the development of key partnerships and research of new markets that will help the company achieve target objectives.

    Brittany manages Planet’s natural disaster and humanitarian response operations and oversees Planet’s Disaster Data program. Planet has responded to over 100 natural disasters under Brittany’s management, helping countless people around the world more quickly recover from disasters. Before joining Planet, Brittany spent several years in the NASA DEVELOP Program at both NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) and NASA Ames Research Center, responsible for managing research projects funded through the NASA Applied Sciences Program with an emphasis in the natural disaster applications. Brittany was chosen to lead the DEVELOP JPL office and subsequently the Ames Research Center office, and she excelled in driving innovation among her peers. She was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year. Learn more about Brittany.

     

       

     

    This podcast is sponsored by

    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Taylor Kerl, Systems...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Taylor Kerl, Systems Engineer at Maxar Technologies and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Taylor shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Taylor joined Maxar in 2017 after receiving her Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Taylor quickly distinguished herself upon joining Maxar, becoming the propulsion mission operations lead for both bi-propellant and electric propulsion subsystems. She has since supported orbit raising for more than twelve geostationary spacecraft, including long-duration electric orbit raising. Taylor served as the lead electric propulsion systems engineer for the NASA Psyche spacecraft that will embark on a deep space mission to a metallic asteroid. In this position, she developed, validated and delivered a new electric propulsion subsystem that utilizes high power hall-effect stationary plasma thrusters (SPTs) that serve as the primary propulsion element for the deep space mission.

    Most recently, Taylor has stepped in as the interim Project Manager for two NASA Tipping Point studies that aim to mature electric propulsion system capability for flight on NASA’s Power and Propulsion Element mission. In addition, Taylor was chosen as lead systems engineer for guidance, navigation and controls (GNC) on a new, developmental modular bus that is scheduled to fly for the first time in 2021. In this role, she is a part of the team that came up with new spacecraft assembly, integration and test philosophies not only for the modular bus but as a streamlined process to deliver other spacecraft to launch base in reduced time. Taylor was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year. Learn more about Taylor.

     

       

     

    This podcast is sponsored by

    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Daniel...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Daniel Alvarez, Space Mission Program Manager at Millennium Space Systems (A Boeing Company) and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Daniel shares insights about his career path, the lessons he has learned and the mentors who have helped him along the way.

    At the age of 31, Dan has served and excelled in many roles since joining the Boeing Company. As a Mechanical Design Engineer, he was a key designer of Boeing’s Modular Reflector, which significantly reduced the cost of a reflector and is now baselined on all of Boeing’s largest commercial satellites. Dan is an accomplished Responsible Engineering Authority, a role in which he championed part count reduction and numerous design improvements that led to reducing the antenna drawing release plan period-of-performance for satellites from twelve months down to just three. As an Integrated Product Team Lead, he was responsible for more than $250 million in value for critical national program efforts, and, on a different project, executed the fastest-ever Non-Recurring Engineering cycle time to antenna design completed. Dan has also proven himself a valuable creative force during his time at Boeing, as he was the primary inventor of the patent-pending High Density Routing Assembly, for which he received one of only six Special Invention Awards in the entire Boeing Company in 2018. Dan’s current role at Millennium Space Systems is as a Space Mission Program Manager, where he is leading one of Millennium’s flagship programs. He was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and a Promise Award winner in that same year. Learn more about Dan.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Julian Horvath,...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Julian Horvath, Principal Engineer for Satellite & Ground Operations at Iridium and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Julian shares insights about his career path, the lessons he has learned and the mentors who have helped him along the way, plus a bit about his summer this year.

    Julian began his career as a Systems Engineer at General Dynamics after receiving his Bachelor of Science in Space Physics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In his next position at Orbital Sciences Corporation, he led the systems engineering effort to design and implement an on-orbit data storage solution for all on-orbit vehicles, for which he received an award from the company.

    Julian joined Iridium in 2012 and was the youngest employee ever at the company to be promoted to Principal Engineer. In this position, Julian was tasked with leading the launch preparation, on-orbit testing, operational checkout and mission activation for Iridium NEXT, one of the largest constellations of commercial satellites ever launched. He led the successful execution of eight launches over two years by working very closely with the French-based Thales Alenia Space team as well as Iridium’s launch, space and operations teams to ensure all new satellites were built and launched as quickly and safely as possible. Once deployed, all seventy-five satellites were contacted successfully on the very first attempt. He was chosen as one of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and received a Promise Award in the same year. Learn more about Julian.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Natalia Larrea Brito, Principal Advisor at Euroconsult and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Natalia shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way, plus a bit about her summer this year.

    Natalia completed a Master's in Aerospace Engineering from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and a Bachelor's and Master's in Telecommunications Engineering from Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Madrid, Spain). She also holds a Diploma in Astronomy and Planetary Science from the Open University UK and is a graduate of the International Space University (ISU) SSP14 program, for which she received SSPI’s International Scholarship that year.

    In her current role at  Euroconsult, she manages research activities and consulting missions for government and private organizations in the space sector. She focuses on the assessment of government programs, new technologies and the strategic analysis of industrial and commercial space markets with special focus on space exploration. She supports and advises established and developing space players, assessing new satellite programs, defining new space policies and conducting socio-economic studies. She has contributed to developing Euroconsult’s business practice on space exploration. During the past years, Natalia has also been a speaker and moderator at different international conferences, and she has contributed to multiple publications on space-related topics. She was chosen as one of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and received a Promise Award in the same year. Learn more about Natalia.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Rob Lyon, Chief Engineer and Executive Director of Flight Assurance at Maxar Technologies and the 2019 SSPI Mentor of the Year. Rob shares insights about mentorship, managing a team and the leadership lessons he has learned throughout his career, plus a little something about his summer plans this year.

    In his role as Executive Director of Flight Assurance, one he has held for six years, Rob determines whether a spacecraft is ready to launch, making him responsible for discovering any technical anomalies pre-launch and seeing them quickly and properly fixed. He monitors all missions from Maxar’s Mission Control Center to ensure that good decisions are made by the flight operations team. Rob was chosen for this critical role based on his deep technical expertise and his proven ability to make sound decisions under pressure and lead every team he has headed at Maxar to success.

    Since joining Maxar, Rob has been a highly sought-after mentor in the company’s formal mentoring program for high potential employees. His mentees consistently develop improved business acumen and technical and leadership skills, leading to quicker promotions and greater employee retention. Rob is seen by many at the company as a “go to” mentor for employees, particularly those facing professional challenges that might otherwise lead them to leave the company. For example, he once formed a cohort of four Maxar employees working under him to pursue an RF Engineering Certificate from UC San Diego based on one employee’s interest in the program. He was chosen as SSPI's 2019 Mentor of the Year. Learn more about Rob.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders interview conducted at the Hall of Fame Celebration, we hear from Paul Gaske, Executive VP and General Manager for North...

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    In this Making Leaders interview conducted at the Hall of Fame Celebration, we hear from Paul Gaske, Executive VP and General Manager for North America at Hughes Network Systems and one of the three inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2020.

    For much of its early history, the communications satellite business was all about video. TV distribution and contribution provided growing revenues and high margins, while giving broadcasters a uniquely cost-effective way to get programming to billions of viewers. But as early as the 1980s, Paul Gaske was pursuing a different destiny– a future in data networking. Joining Digital Communications Corp. – a classic garage startup founded by Hall of Famers John Puente and Burton Edelson, and other industry notables Gene Gabbard and Andy Werth – he designed satellite TDMA systems for Intelsat signatories in the engineering department headed by Pradman Kaul, also a Hall of Famer. The company was acquired by MA-Com, where Paul became part of the team that created the first interactive data VSATs and launched the satellite data networking business. Among its first customers were the retail networks of such major corporations as Wal-Mart, Chrysler and General Motors.

    Then in 1987, Hughes acquired the company and launched a revolution in satellite data services. With Paul spearheading development of products and services, Hughes Network Systems grew into the world’s leading supplier of VSAT technology for, retail, enterprise networking and other markets. Nine years later, Paul led the launch of the satellite internet service now known as HughesNet®. In the decades since then, he drove the growth of HughesNet and was part of the executive team that led the company through a series of business changes and technical and operational advances: most notably the roll out of High-Throughput Satellite services on the JUPITER™ System. Read more about Paul.

     

     

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    This interview was sponsored by

    SSPI's Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

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    In this conversation, the final of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks...

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    In this conversation, the final of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks with four of the youngest and brightest stars of the future in the commercial space & satellite industry. Clémentine DecoopmanSajit JumaniJomya Lei and Jeremy Turpin are all members of the 2019 “20 Under 35” cohort, chosen for their initiative, creativity and problem-solving skills that has led to outstanding achievements in the industry before the age of 35.

    Clémentine Decoopman is Executive Director of the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC). Since joining SGAC, Clémentine has proposed many creative strategies for seeking agreements with sponsors and developing the future space workforce and has implemented them successfully by negotiating with key stakeholders and reaching out to non-traditional space actors as well. She was instrumental in establishing the Memorandum of Understanding between the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UN OOSA) and SGAC, an agreement under which SGAC and the UN OOSA committed to work jointly in supporting young people in line with the Secretary General’s ‘Youth 2030 strategy,’ launched in September 2018. UNOOSA and SGAC delivered a global ‘Space for Youth’ Competition aimed at engaging youth in the discussion of how space science and technology can be used to power the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 

    Sajit Jumani is Vice President of Business Development and Finance at GEOshare. He began his career in the Lockheed Martin Operations Leadership Development Program, where he completed rotations in manufacturing, sustainment, quality, sourcing and international business development, honing a wide variety of skills. After graduating from the program, Sajit completed his MBA at UNC Chapel Hill and led the development of international strategy for Lockheed Martin Space before joining GEOshare as a Manager. He rose to a position of Director and then Vice President of Business Development and Finance in only three years of working at GEOshare, taking on responsibility for eighteen major customers. Sajit’s professional responsibilities include managing customer relationships, collaborating directly with customers on the development of their requirements, and providing financial options that suit the customers’ individual business needs.

    Jomya Lei is Lead Payload Systems Engineer at The Boeing Company. Her responsibilities include interfacing with customers, suppliers, cross-functional team members and senior leadership to execute on the project spanning the entire lifecycle: negotiating low-level designs, managing system risks/opportunities, product manufacturing and specification validation/verification.  Jomya was an instrumental member of the team that negotiated Boeing’s Kacific partnership and joined the program team once it was secured. She currently serves as Lead Payload Systems Engineer on the Kacific-1 and JCSAT-18 programs, which aim to provide affordable broadband communications to Japan and countries in the Pacific and Southeast Asia.

    Jeremy Turpin is CTO and Co-Founder of Isotropic Systems and a new member of SSPI’s Board of Directors, pending election by the membership in June. He began his career as the president and founder of E x H, Inc., where he was responsible for software development and commercialization of the ray-tracing software package for modelling, design and optimization of inhomogenous optical devices. Jeremy became a co-founder of Isotropic Systems after recruiting a CEO for E x H and took on the role of Chief Technology Officer, a position in which he leads the company’s Lens Array Antenna product development activities. He is responsible for all of Isotropic’s engineering activities, recruiting, IP protection and patent filings and development of new applications of the Isotropic Lens Array technology.

     

     

    This is the final podcast of a four-part series on mentorship sponsored by

    SSPI’s podcast is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders interview conducted at the Hall of Fame Celebration, we hear from Steve Collar, CEO of SES and one of the three inductees to...

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    In this Making Leaders interview conducted at the Hall of Fame Celebration, we hear from Steve Collar, CEO of SES and one of the three inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2020.

    In 2011, Steve Collar became CEO of O3b Networks, the company founded four years earlier by Hall of Famer Greg Wyler.  The impact of his leadership soon made itself felt.  Within two years, the company launched the first four satellites of its pioneering MEO constellation and added another eight the following year, and later bringing the number of O3b satellites launched to 20 in 2019.  By 2016, O3b had built a firm backlog of $350 million with more than $100 million in current-year revenue, making it the fastest-growing satellite operator in history. 

    SES was one of the company’s early investors and, in 2016, it exercised its option to acquire O3b Networks. The deal created the first communications satellite operator with spacecraft in both GEO and MEO orbits.  Steve was appointed CEO of SES Networks, the newly-formed data-centric business unit of SES, in May 2017.  Less than a year later, he became CEO of SES.  Behind his fast rise was a major transformation in the marketplace, which demanded aggressive response from the company.  Video distribution and contribution had long provided most of SES’s revenue, but the explosive growth of online streaming triggered what soon became an accelerating decline in that business, with impacts across all the major satellite operators.  With its significant exposure to that decline, SES needed a fast-growing source of replacement revenue, and SES Networks looked set to deliver it.  Read more about Steve.

     

     

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    SSPI's Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making...

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    In this Making Leaders interview conducted at the Hall of Fame Celebration, we hear from Tory Bruno, President & CEO of United Launch Alliance and one of the three inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2020.

    Tory Bruno came to United Launch Alliance (ULA) in 2014 after a long career managing programs for some of the most advanced and powerful weapons systems in the American arsenal. As general manager of Lockheed Martin Strategic and Missile Defense Systems, he led a team of men and women responsible for the Navy’s Trident II D5 Fleet Ballistic Missile, the Air Force’s ICBM Reentry Systems and the Terminal High Area Altitude Defense System (THAAD). He managed a joint venture responsible for producing and safely maintaining the UK’s nuclear weapons and has engineered control systems for rockets and hypersonic weapons, for which he holds numerous patents. No words describe him better than Tom Wolfe’s famous phrase, “a steely-eyed missile man.”

    When he was tapped to lead ULA, the company was at a crossroads. What had been an effective monopoly on national security and NASA missions had turned competitive as new commercial competitors entered the business. The company needed to adapt to survive. This veteran of military space and missile programs might not have seemed the obvious choice of leader, but he was soon to prove doubters wrong. Read more about Tory.

     

     

    You can watch the interview above or listen to the podcast version below:

     

       

     

    This interview was sponsored by

    SSPI's Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this conversation, the third of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks with two...

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    In this conversation, the third of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks with two men whose careers have taken them to the top of their respective professions at some of the industry’s largest corporations. They share with us the unique advantages and challenges of mentorship “inside a giant.”

    Airbus is an international company and a leader in designing, manufacturing and delivering aerospace products. And with 133,671 employees, it certainly qualifies as a giant.

    Its US Space & Defence Group is led by Chris Emerson. Chris has served as president of the group since 2019, where he oversees the operations and strategy of all its companies in the USA. He also serves as Chairman of the Board.

     Founded in 1948 by David Ogilvy, this ad agency can be found in 132 offices in 83 countries around the world. Adweeks’ Agency of the Year in 2016, Ogilvy’s client list is long and ranges from American Express to Ikea to Samsung.

    Ben Levine serves as Executive Partner and Head of Global Partnerships from Ogilvy’s main office in New York. He is responsible for developing and growing strategic relations across the Ogilvy Group, its parent company WPP and external networks to find greater value for its clients. Ben also serves as Global Client Leader for the agency.

     

     

    This is the third podcast of a four-part series on mentorship sponsored by

    SSPI’s podcast is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this conversation, the second of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks with...

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    In this conversation, the second of a four-part series on mentorship, SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Lou Zacharilla speaks with three women mentors and leaders of the industry.

    Dr. Jennifer Dawson is the Staff Functional Safety Engineer with the Toyota Research Institute.  Before that, she worked at Space Systems Loral as the Technical Director for Robotic Servicing of Geosynchronous Satellites, as Head of Safety and Technical Program Manager at Nuro and as a researcher at Stanford University, where she developed a cryogenic test facility, conducted experiments on a superconducting position sensor, defined requirements, and fabricated and tested customized electrical connectors. Dr. Dawson received a Promise Award from SSPI in 2016 and was also responsible for nominating the 2019 Mentor of the Year, Rob Lyon, whom you heard from in Episode 1.

    Penelope Longbottom is a member of the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame who has devoted her career to explaining satellites as one of the industry’s premiere public relations executives. She served in a variety of jobs, from Director of Communications and later Vice President at Hughes to Senior Marketing Communications Executive with Lockheed Martin Intersputnik, Lockheed Martin Space & Strategic Missiles and XM Satellite Radio. While at Hughes, Penelope was key to the promotion of DirectTV and America’s first Mobile Satellite System. She founded Longbottom Communications and merged the company with Sage Communications one decade later. Penelope has been a relentless advocate for more space for women in the industry and has been a mentor to dozens.

    Nicole Stott was seen recently in super bowl commercial with Busy Philipps and Lilly Singh riding the first Olay rocket! It was her third mission to space. Nicole is a retired NASA astronaut who performed two important missions on the International Space Station, where she served as flight engineer for Expeditions 20 and 21. She was a Mission Specialist on Space Shuttle Missions 128 and 133. Nicole began her career as a Structural Design Engineer with Pratt & Whitney.  She was the first astronaut to have a picture taken with the SSPI logo from space.

     

     

    This is the second podcast of a four-part series on mentorship sponsored by

    SSPI’s podcast is made possible with the support of our corporate partners