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  • Tamara Bond-Williams posted an article

    In this Making Leaders interview, retired US Naval mathematician  Dr. Gladys West, a pioneering contributor to the creation of the GPS system, and the first African-American inductee to the 

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    In this Making Leaders interview, retired US Naval mathematician  Dr. Gladys West, a pioneering contributor to the creation of the GPS system, and the first African-American inductee to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021 joins SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell to explore her journey from "hidden figure" to "Hall of Fame. Her story is finally being told as the industry celebrates her legacy and gleans from her what it means to be a trailblazing leader. 

    Dr. Gladys B. West served as a mathematician at the Naval Proving Ground (now the Naval Surface Warfare Center) in Dahlgren, VA for forty-two years before her retirement in 1998. During her long career, she led a multi-year project that created a mathematical model of unprecedented accuracy of the shape of Earth, which proved to be a critical building block in the development of Global Positioning by Satellite.

    In 1956, she became the second-ever black woman hired to work at the Naval Proving Ground in Dahlgren, VA. She initially served as a programmer in the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division for large-scale computers and also as project manager for data-processing systems used in the analysis of satellite data. During this time, she also earned her second Masters degree from the University of Oklahoma, this time in Public Administration. In the early 1960s, Dr. West worked on an award-winning astronomical study that demonstrated the regularity of Pluto’s motion relative to Neptune. Her work on the astronomical study led Dr. West to begin analyzing data from satellites to put together altimeter-based models of Earth's shape. Based on this work, her supervisor recommended her for the position of project manager for the Seasat radar altimetry project, using the first satellite that could remotely sense oceans. Read more about Dr. West.

     

          

     

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast series, we hear from some of the many voices of promise in the SEDS USA and UKSEDS organizations. These student leaders have demonstrated early dedication and talent in space...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast series, we hear from some of the many voices of promise in the SEDS USA and UKSEDS organizations. These student leaders have demonstrated early dedication and talent in space and satellite through SSPI/SEDS student competitions. In this second episode, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with two members of the second-place-winning University of Colorado Boulder team from the 2019-2020 Competition: Taking Out the Trash: Andrew Swackhamer and Mack Rodgers. Andrew and Mack speak with Robert about their experiences in the 2019-2020 Competition and their plans and hopes for the future.

    Andrew Swackhamer is a junior at the University of Colorado at Boulder, studying aerospace engineering. He is also a research assistant at Space & Sustainability Initiative and a lab technician at Designed Technology. Mack Rodgers is also a junior at UC Boulder, studying astrophysics and music, with a specialty in voice. For the 2019-2020 Competition, they were joined by teammates Evie Clark, Devin Desilva and Skylar Gale.

     

          

      

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders interview, we hear from Jim L. Oliver, Founder, Owner and CEO of AvL Technologies and one of the four inductees to the 

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    In this Making Leaders interview, we hear from Jim L. Oliver, Founder, Owner and CEO of AvL Technologies and one of the four inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021. Jim Oliver is a satellite communications pioneer, innovative design engineer and successful entrepreneur now in the sixth decade of his career. The innovations he brought to the satellite ground segment have been instrumental in freeing the satellite antenna from its fixed base and moving it out into the field for users from broadcasting and disaster relief to government and military. The world has gained in knowledge, lives saved, health restored and greater safety and security as a result.

    Jim began his journey at Lockheed in 1968 as a designer of antenna positioners, sensors and stabilizers for U.S. Air Force LEO spy satellites. At Lockheed he pioneered a 3-dimensional single axis antenna positioner to replace dual 2-dimensional axis positioners. Jim went on to join the Antenna Division of Scientific-Atlanta in 1978 as an engineering manager. This was during the early days of cable TV, and he designed the antennas that enabled ESPN and CNN to go on the air. He left S-A in 1981 to cofound SatCom Technologies with Marvin Shoemake and David Speed, and he designed and manufactured fixed Earth station antennas to support C-band and Ku-band spectra for the growing broadcast satellite market. 

    Jim's biggest success began with his retirement in the early 1990s after he sold his interest in SatCom. Growing bored with retired life, he was doing consulting work when an old customer asked him to design an SNG antenna that could operate on a standard size van. He saw a clever aircraft cable drive design in a magazine and pursued the patent rights, then designed the cable drive into an antenna positioner with significantly lower weight than comparable antennas. Substituting multiple cables for a geared drive system, it provided very high precision and stiffness, and did not suffer the degradation experienced by geared systems over time. This elegantly simple solution was also maintenance-free and able to operate in a very wide range of environments. In September of that year, Jim formally established AvL Technologies and hired his first employee, who works there to this day. Read more about Jim.

     

       

     

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     September 27, 2021
  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders interview, we hear from Kathryn L. Lueders, Associate Administrator for Human...

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    In this Making Leaders interview, we hear from Kathryn L. Lueders, Associate Administrator for Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate at NASA and one of the four inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021. For nearly thirty years Kathy has played an indispensable role in bringing the capabilities of the commercial space and satellite industry to NASA; serving human space exploration missions though new technology, practices of cost savings, and opening valuable opportunities for the industry.

    Kathy began her career at NASA in 1992 as the Shuttle Orbital Maneuvering System and Reaction Control Systems Depot Manager for the White Sands Test Facility in New Mexico, after completing two Bachelor’s degrees in Science and Business Administration and a Masters of Science degree. Kathy moved to the International Space Station (ISS) Program next and served in a variety of managerial roles covering space station Logistics and Maintenance, Vehicle Systems Integration and Commercial Orbital Transportation Services Integration.

    In November 2007, Kathy became responsible for expanding the range of launch vehicles providing access to the International Space Station. She established the Program's Transportation Integration where she oversaw international partner vehicles, including the European Space Agency's Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV), the Japanese Space Agency's H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV), and the Russian Soyuz and Progress spacecraft. Read more about Kathy.

     

       

     

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     September 20, 2021
  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, we hear from Peter B. de Selding,...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, we hear from Peter B. de Selding, Co-Founder and Chief Editor of SpaceIntelReport and one of the four inductees to the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021. For more than thirty years, Peter has been the preeminent commercial space reporter in the space & satellite industry and is widely admired for his formidable, unsentimental, yet fair and ethical reporting.

    Peter joined the staff of Space News in December 1989 shortly after the magazine’s founding. His original beat was to cover space activity in Europe. Almost immediately, his coverage was so thorough that it established the English-language tabloid as a must-read for European space officials, whether they are in industry, the military or civil space. His understanding of technology, balance sheets and go-to-market strategies, backed by intense curiosity and determination, gradually made his work indispensable to the executive management of space and satellite companies, investment banks and insurance companies around the globe.

    In 2017, Peter co-founded SpaceIntelReport.com and became Chief Editor. Since its founding, SpaceIntelReport has delivered some of the most accurate, reliable and insightful reporting in the business. That quality led SSPI, in 2015, to present Peter with a Better Satellite World award in recognition of his role in making a better industry. Read more about Peter.

     

       

     

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    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

     September 13, 2021
  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this podcast, recorded as...

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    In this podcast, recorded as part of the Leadership in Turbulent Times conference on March 22, members of the Hall of Fame and 20 Under 35 answer questions about leading people, projects and companies through the first global pandemic of the space and satellite age, and the long recovery from it. The panel was moderated by SSPI Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla and featured the following speakers:

    In 2011, Steve Collar became CEO of O3b Networks, the company founded four years earlier by Hall of Famer Greg Wyler. The impact of his leadership soon made itself felt. Within two years, the company launched the first four satellites of its pioneering MEO constellation and added another eight the following year, and later bringing the number of O3b satellites launched to 20 in 2019. By 2016, O3b Networks had built a firm backlog of $350 million with more than $100 million in current-year revenue, making it the fastest-growing satellite operator in history. SES was one of the company’s early investors and, in 2016, exercised its option to acquire O3b Networks. The deal created the first communications satellite operator with spacecraft in both GEO and MEO orbits. Steve was appointed CEO of SES Networks, the newly-formed data-centric business unit of SES, in May 2017. Steve Collar was inducted into the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2019. Read More 

    Jim Oliver is an inventor and entrepreneur with a proven record of achievement in ground segment technology. He has made major contributions to freeing satellite ground systems from fixed locations throughout his career, from his work at SatCom Technologies—where he led the introduction of innovative technologies for fixed and truck-mounted antennas—to the creation at AvL of high-accuracy pointing technologies for small portable antennas for commercial and military use. Jim’s technological contributions have greatly expanded the applications for satellite communications in ways that save lives and expand opportunities for millions. Jim Oliver was inducted into the Space & Satellite Hall of Fame in 2021. Read More

    Brittany Zajic is a natural disaster research scientist turned businesswoman. She brings 6 years of geospatial industry experience to Planet, working across both public and private sectors, including several years in the Earth Science Division at NASA. In her current role at Planet, she manages the Disaster Data Program, providing first responders access to Planet imagery in the event of large disaster events to accelerate humanitarian and disaster response. As a member of the business development team, she is also responsible for the development of key partnerships and research of new markets that will help the company achieve target objectives. Brittany Zajic was a member of the 20 Under 35 cohort in 2020 and a Promise Award winner. Read More

     Zackary Downey began his career working in data visualization and applied economics. After graduating with a double bachelor’s degree in Mathematics and Economics from Boston College, he joined Ursa as a Data Scientist and Product Developer in 2016. During his time at Ursa, Zackary developed and has helped market the world’s first commercial data subscription product based on radar satellite data. His product—a powerful but easy-to-use weekly report on the world’s oil storage based on commercial satellite radar imaging data—is sold to leading commodity traders, banks and hedge funds. While creating Ursa’s oil storage reports, Zackary has led a multi-disciplinary team in product development and production, including image analysis and supply-chain management. Zachary Downey was a member of the 20 Under 35 cohort in 2018. Read More

     

          

     

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    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast series, we hear from some of the many voices of promise in the...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast series, we hear from some of the many voices of promise in the SEDS USA and UKSEDS organizations. These student leaders have demonstrated early dedication and talent in space and satellite through SSPI/SEDS student competitions. In this first episode, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with three members of the winning NYU Abu Dhabi team from the 2019-2020 Competition: Taking Out the Trash: Alison Waterman, Hannah Kasak-Gliboff and Aaryan Sharma. Alison, Hannah and Aaryan speak with Robert about their experiences in the 2019-2020 Competition and their plans and hopes for the future.

    Alison Waterman is passionate about increasing access to space technology and quality STEM education for students around the world. She graduated with her Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from New York University Abu Dhabi in May 2020, where she specialized in embedded control systems for CubeSats and UAVs and was the president of the SEDS Aerospace Club and Women Empowered in STEM organizations. She is now working full-time in the space industry at DreamUp PBC, a company that provides space-based research opportunities and educational products for students of all ages.

    Hannah Kasak-Gliboff is a senior at New York University Abu Dhabi majoring in the social sciences with a focus on the environment. As someone passionate about sustainability on Earth, the space debris challenge presents an interesting new frontier for sustainable design thinking and environmental policy.

     

     

    Aaryan Sharma is a 2nd-year undergraduate student pursuing a Physics major at New York University Abu Dhabi. Aaryan is passionate about space exploration and is the current Vice President of the SEDS Aerospace Club at NYUAD. When not contemplating the meaning of life, he likes to spend his free time playing and watching sports or enjoying a good science fiction movie. He also actively supports the cause of inclusion by learning sign language.

     
     

          

      

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    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Craig Clark, Founder and CSO of AAC Clyde Space. Craig talks about his career path and the challenges of building a successful small satellite company from the ground up.

    After graduating with a BE in Electrical Power Engineering from the University of Glasgow, Craig Clark began his career at Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd., where he served as Power Systems Team Leader. After 11 years at Surrey Satellite Technology, he returned to Glasgow and founded Clyde Space Ltd. in October 2005. Clyde Space launched Scotland's first satellite in 2014 and has established itself as one of the most successful suppliers of small satellites in the world. In January 2018, Clyde Space merged with Swedish listed company AAC Microtec, and the combined company continues to grow and develop cutting-edge products for the small satellite market, particularly in the area of cubesats. In June 2013, Craig was awarded an MBE in the Queen's birthday Honours list for his services to Innovation and Technology and, in 2017, Clyde Space won the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the Innovation Category. He served as a member of the UK Space Leadership Council from 2010 to 2016, providing advice to the UK Space Agency on its work plan and future opportunities. Craig is a member of the Council of Economic Advisors to the Scottish Government and has served in that position since 2018.

     

          

     

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  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zimmerman, Principal Investigator and Aerospace...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zimmerman, Principal Investigator and Aerospace Engineer at Paragon Space Development and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Brittany shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Brittany Zimmerman has spent 30 years working on expanding her breadth of skills to build a synergy of competencies to achieve her lifetime goal: organizational success through bettering the conditions of humanity.  She takes the old philosophy of leaving the world a better place than you found it to the next level. In her most recent of many ventures, Brittany is implementing her multidisciplinary expertise of space systems to simplify complexities and make life support technologies easily accessible and affordable for terrestrial humanity. For this and other projects, she is seeking partners and investors.

    To continually diversify her activities and skills, she has opened a new location to a 501(c)(3) where she acts as Board Member and Director of Operations for a nonprofit which ensures safety and education to cross-cultural youth in California and Arizona. Brittany joined Paragon Space Development as an Aerospace Systems Engineer in 2016 after completing two internships at IEWC and Rockwell Automation as well as serving as an Aerospace Systems Engineer at Rockwell Collins, where she worked on design and architecture of the Bombardier Global cockpit system. She also worked as a Research Assistant while studying at the University of North Dakota (UND), where she developed plant conveyer cycles in closed-loop life support systems intended for long-duration spaceflight and a greenhouse module for the NASA Inflatable Lunar/Martian Habitat. Brittany was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year.  Learn more about Brittany.

     

       

     

    This podcast is sponsored by

    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zajic, Business Development and Disaster Response...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Brittany Zajic, Business Development and Disaster Response Operations Lead at Planet and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Brittany shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Brittany is a natural disaster research scientist turned businesswoman. She brings 6 years of geospatial industry experience to Planet, working across both public and private sectors, including several years in the Earth Science Division at NASA. In her current role at Planet, she manages the Disaster Data Program, providing first responders access to Planet imagery in the event of large disaster events to accelerate humanitarian and disaster response. As a member of the business development team, she is also responsible for the development of key partnerships and research of new markets that will help the company achieve target objectives.

    Brittany manages Planet’s natural disaster and humanitarian response operations and oversees Planet’s Disaster Data program. Planet has responded to over 100 natural disasters under Brittany’s management, helping countless people around the world more quickly recover from disasters. Before joining Planet, Brittany spent several years in the NASA DEVELOP Program at both NASA Jet Propulsion Lab (JPL) and NASA Ames Research Center, responsible for managing research projects funded through the NASA Applied Sciences Program with an emphasis in the natural disaster applications. Brittany was chosen to lead the DEVELOP JPL office and subsequently the Ames Research Center office, and she excelled in driving innovation among her peers. She was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year. Learn more about Brittany.

     

       

     

    This podcast is sponsored by

    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Taylor Kerl, Systems...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Taylor Kerl, Systems Engineer at Maxar Technologies and a 2020 Promise Award recipient. Taylor shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way.

    Taylor joined Maxar in 2017 after receiving her Bachelor’s degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln. Taylor quickly distinguished herself upon joining Maxar, becoming the propulsion mission operations lead for both bi-propellant and electric propulsion subsystems. She has since supported orbit raising for more than twelve geostationary spacecraft, including long-duration electric orbit raising. Taylor served as the lead electric propulsion systems engineer for the NASA Psyche spacecraft that will embark on a deep space mission to a metallic asteroid. In this position, she developed, validated and delivered a new electric propulsion subsystem that utilizes high power hall-effect stationary plasma thrusters (SPTs) that serve as the primary propulsion element for the deep space mission.

    Most recently, Taylor has stepped in as the interim Project Manager for two NASA Tipping Point studies that aim to mature electric propulsion system capability for flight on NASA’s Power and Propulsion Element mission. In addition, Taylor was chosen as lead systems engineer for guidance, navigation and controls (GNC) on a new, developmental modular bus that is scheduled to fly for the first time in 2021. In this role, she is a part of the team that came up with new spacecraft assembly, integration and test philosophies not only for the modular bus but as a streamlined process to deliver other spacecraft to launch base in reduced time. Taylor was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2020 and received a Promise Award in that same year. Learn more about Taylor.

     

       

     

    This podcast is sponsored by

    With additional support from 2020 Promise Award Ceremony sponsor

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Daniel...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell speaks with Daniel Alvarez, Space Mission Program Manager at Millennium Space Systems (A Boeing Company) and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Daniel shares insights about his career path, the lessons he has learned and the mentors who have helped him along the way.

    At the age of 31, Dan has served and excelled in many roles since joining the Boeing Company. As a Mechanical Design Engineer, he was a key designer of Boeing’s Modular Reflector, which significantly reduced the cost of a reflector and is now baselined on all of Boeing’s largest commercial satellites. Dan is an accomplished Responsible Engineering Authority, a role in which he championed part count reduction and numerous design improvements that led to reducing the antenna drawing release plan period-of-performance for satellites from twelve months down to just three. As an Integrated Product Team Lead, he was responsible for more than $250 million in value for critical national program efforts, and, on a different project, executed the fastest-ever Non-Recurring Engineering cycle time to antenna design completed. Dan has also proven himself a valuable creative force during his time at Boeing, as he was the primary inventor of the patent-pending High Density Routing Assembly, for which he received one of only six Special Invention Awards in the entire Boeing Company in 2018. Dan’s current role at Millennium Space Systems is as a Space Mission Program Manager, where he is leading one of Millennium’s flagship programs. He was a member of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and a Promise Award winner in that same year. Learn more about Dan.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Julian Horvath,...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Julian Horvath, Principal Engineer for Satellite & Ground Operations at Iridium and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Julian shares insights about his career path, the lessons he has learned and the mentors who have helped him along the way, plus a bit about his summer this year.

    Julian began his career as a Systems Engineer at General Dynamics after receiving his Bachelor of Science in Space Physics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. In his next position at Orbital Sciences Corporation, he led the systems engineering effort to design and implement an on-orbit data storage solution for all on-orbit vehicles, for which he received an award from the company.

    Julian joined Iridium in 2012 and was the youngest employee ever at the company to be promoted to Principal Engineer. In this position, Julian was tasked with leading the launch preparation, on-orbit testing, operational checkout and mission activation for Iridium NEXT, one of the largest constellations of commercial satellites ever launched. He led the successful execution of eight launches over two years by working very closely with the French-based Thales Alenia Space team as well as Iridium’s launch, space and operations teams to ensure all new satellites were built and launched as quickly and safely as possible. Once deployed, all seventy-five satellites were contacted successfully on the very first attempt. He was chosen as one of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and received a Promise Award in the same year. Learn more about Julian.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Natalia Larrea Brito, Principal Advisor at Euroconsult and a 2019 Promise Award recipient. Natalia shares insights about her career path, the lessons she has learned and the mentors who have helped her along the way, plus a bit about her summer this year.

    Natalia completed a Master's in Aerospace Engineering from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and a Bachelor's and Master's in Telecommunications Engineering from Universidad Alfonso X El Sabio (Madrid, Spain). She also holds a Diploma in Astronomy and Planetary Science from the Open University UK and is a graduate of the International Space University (ISU) SSP14 program, for which she received SSPI’s International Scholarship that year.

    In her current role at  Euroconsult, she manages research activities and consulting missions for government and private organizations in the space sector. She focuses on the assessment of government programs, new technologies and the strategic analysis of industrial and commercial space markets with special focus on space exploration. She supports and advises established and developing space players, assessing new satellite programs, defining new space policies and conducting socio-economic studies. She has contributed to developing Euroconsult’s business practice on space exploration. During the past years, Natalia has also been a speaker and moderator at different international conferences, and she has contributed to multiple publications on space-related topics. She was chosen as one of SSPI's 20 Under 35 in 2019 and received a Promise Award in the same year. Learn more about Natalia.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners

  • Victoria Krisman posted an article

    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and...

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    In this Making Leaders podcast, SSPI Executive Director Robert Bell and Director of Development and Innovation Louis Zacharilla speak with Rob Lyon, Chief Engineer and Executive Director of Flight Assurance at Maxar Technologies and the 2019 SSPI Mentor of the Year. Rob shares insights about mentorship, managing a team and the leadership lessons he has learned throughout his career, plus a little something about his summer plans this year.

    In his role as Executive Director of Flight Assurance, one he has held for six years, Rob determines whether a spacecraft is ready to launch, making him responsible for discovering any technical anomalies pre-launch and seeing them quickly and properly fixed. He monitors all missions from Maxar’s Mission Control Center to ensure that good decisions are made by the flight operations team. Rob was chosen for this critical role based on his deep technical expertise and his proven ability to make sound decisions under pressure and lead every team he has headed at Maxar to success.

    Since joining Maxar, Rob has been a highly sought-after mentor in the company’s formal mentoring program for high potential employees. His mentees consistently develop improved business acumen and technical and leadership skills, leading to quicker promotions and greater employee retention. Rob is seen by many at the company as a “go to” mentor for employees, particularly those facing professional challenges that might otherwise lead them to leave the company. For example, he once formed a cohort of four Maxar employees working under him to pursue an RF Engineering Certificate from UC San Diego based on one employee’s interest in the program. He was chosen as SSPI's 2019 Mentor of the Year. Learn more about Rob.

     

       

     

    This podcast is also available as a video interview:

     

    SSPI’s Making Leaders campaign is made possible with the support of our corporate partners