Skip to Main Content

Opening the Final Frontier

Space really is the final frontier. Since Star Trek first crossed TV screens in 1966, we have believed that humanity’s destiny lies among the stars. And in the third decade of the third millennium, we are closer to that dream than ever before. Today, after decades of imagining the future, enterprising companies in partnership with governments are putting into place the practical foundations and critical components of a thriving space economy reaching from LEO to cislunar space. MORE

Podcast

Every Monday during the Opening the Final Frontier campaign, you’ll get to listen to a new podcast featuring experts on a wide variety of topics, including cislunar travel, refueling in space, the role of spaceports, handling orbital debris and more!.

Opening the Final Frontier: We’re There. Now What? – Episode 5 – The Top 3 CIS-Lunar Opportunities & Why They Will Transform Commercial Space

The fifth episode of this series is based on October’s edition of the New York Space Business Roundtable. The episode features a conversation with multiple experts about cislunar opportunities and commercial space.

Following a Significant Digits report by SpaceNews, this episode includes a special report from the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) on the introduction of the anti-satellite missile testing norm presented by USA Vice President Harris as a possible UN resolution and its potential impact on ensuring greater international security for space and the cislunar economy expansion. This podcast series is sponsored by Momentus.

Speakers include:

  • Hussain Bokhari, Senior Analyst, NSR (an Analysys Mason company)
  • Negar Feher, Chief Revenue Officer, SpaceRyde
  • Holly Shorrock, Intelligence Analyst, Office of Intelligence and Analysis Economic Security Mission Center at the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS)
  • Matthew Taylor, Associate Director, Environmental Intelligence and Civil Space, Raytheon Intelligence & Space

Opening the Final Frontier NOW

A live conversation focusing on what’s next from the companies with operational launchers, leading-edge developments and ambitious plans – and how they may grow economic opportunity for rest of the world.

An SSPI-WISE panel session, conducted on November 17, featuring women from a variety of careers in the launch side of space and satellite.

Videos

The Better Satellite World campaign shows the world why our industry, though often invisible, is indispensable to modern life, through powerful stories and videos that depict space and satellite technologies contributing to the economy, society and sustainability of planet Earth. Several of our Better Satellite World videos, as well as many released by Virgin Orbit, focus on the topic of the future space economy, how we get there and what challenges we may face along the way.

Space really is the final frontier. Since Star Trek first crossed TV screens in 1966, we have believed that humanity’s destiny lies among the stars. And in the third decade of the third millennium, we are closer to that dream than ever before. Today, after decades of imagining the future, enterprising companies in partnership with governments are putting into place the practical foundations and critical components of a thriving space economy reaching from LEO to cislunar space:

  • Drastically lower launch costs coupled with an accelerating cadence of launches.
  • Horizontal launch systems that make access to space available to any nation with international airports.
  • A boom in launch sites as national and local governments trigger economic development of spaceports for vertical and horizontal launch.
  • Inter-satellite communications capabilities with the potential to turn satcom in LEO, MEO and GEO into a global mesh network offering massive bandwidth.
  • In-space operations vehicles, fuel depots and manufacturing facilities that, still in their earliest stages, are creating completely new capabilities with commercial value.

Continued progress depends on finding solutions to the human-made problem of space debris. It is a challenge to policy as much as to technology, and to our ability to cooperate as well as compete. But here, too, companies and governments are creating more effective ways to monitor debris of all sizes, to agree on avoidance maneuvering and enforce de-orbiting protocols, and to develop fast and flexible systems to target the most dangerous debris and remove it from orbit. The same innovation that gradually created the space debris problem also offers the best hope of resolving it to keep open the roads to the final frontier.