Better Satellite World: The Stories

The Highway and the Skyway

Teleports take in TV shows and movies, news stories and commercials and turn them into a stream of programs beamed to your TV or mobile device. They build and run the networks that control airplanes in flight and let you use credit cards at a store. They bring the Internet to the screens of millions in developing nations, and make it possible for billions to use their mobile phones. Read More...

Taking Medicine to the Ends of the Earth

Whether in rural counties or remote mines and wellheads, people can find themselves far from help when help is needed most. That is why health systems around the world turn to satellite to extend the reach of medicine and defeat threats to public health before they become catastrophes. Read More...

Making More Money Via Satellite

The mobile phone is much more than a status symbol in your pocket or a handy way to order take-away food. Around the world, it has become a powerful driver of economic growth. But much of the planet offers stiff geographic challenges to mobile phone penetration. Read More...

The Final Battle to End Polio

In 1988, a meeting of the World Health Assembly set a mind-boggling goal: to eradicate the ancient scourge of polio. It was an audacious goal – but 24 years later, the number of polio cases worldwide had fallen by more than 99 percent, saving more than 10 million children from paralysis. Read More...

Breaking the Chains of Slavery

For most of us, slavery is a horror of the past. It is a current reality, however, in more than 100 coun­tries around the planet. The Crossover International Academy is a school and home in the Lake Volta basin of Ghana. It is dedicated to helping children escape from slavery and rebuild their lives. Read More...

How Satellite Brings You a
Better Flight

Affordable air travel is good. Not so good are long, boring flights packed too tight with too little to do. Infuriating delays that ripple through the overburdened system like a bad case of the flu. The world’s airlines and air traffic managers have a solution to all these problems – and the solution is satellite. Read More...

How Satellites Secure the Border

Invisible yet vital, borders define where one place ends and another begins. Borders are in the mind and heart as well as the laws of a nation, and they represent a barrier or a beginning, safety or threat, opportunity realized or opportunity denied. Read More...

Schools Go Online in the Unconnected World

The problems of inequality are complex. Of all the things that could change the fate of children in poorer nations, however, one stands out: education. In rich and poor nations, the better educated you are, the more you earn and the higher will be the standard of living you can give to your own children. Read More...

Filling Up Your Car By Satellite

We depend on fossil fuels pulled from the Earth’s crust for 82% of the energy we use. In developed nations, demand is largely flat, except for transportation.  But emerging economies are growing fast, lifting billions out of poverty, and the rise of their middle classes is powered by fossil fuels. Read More...

Rallying the World to Combat Climate Change

“Everybody talks about the weather,” wrote American author Mark Twain, “but nobody does anything about it.” The same might be said of climate change. To rally global support, a group of activists formed an NGO called Save Our Selves, with the support of former US Vice President and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Al Gore. Read More...

Satellite to the Rescue

Sat phones are mobile or land-based phones that link directly with a satellite in orbit. Every day, without fanfare, sat phones and other portable satellite technology save lives at sea, in deserts and on mountaintops. They rescue vital machinery in far-flung locations from breakdown. They even help ease disasters of the heart. Read More...

Satellite Connections Save Lives

In December 2004, one of the worst natural disasters in the last 100 years struck the Indian Ocean region. Government agencies and NGOs leaped into action to bring food, clean water, medical help, clothing and building materials to the affected region. Read More...

Satellites and the Beautiful Game

The World Cup is the world’s most widely viewed sporting event. How do all those people get to see the most popular game in the world? Satellite is a vital contributor, because of the number of games in different locations that must be covered in a short window of time. Read More...

Building the Broadband Economy

Broadband today costs, on average, a full month’s wages in developing nations, according to a 2013 report on broadband deployment in Africa. In developed countries, the average is just 1.5% of monthly income. That is one reason that only 40% of the world’s people are online. And this lack of connectivity translates, in ways large and small. Read More...

Reporting from the Heart of Disaster

Disasters make news. Whether the catastrophe is an act of nature or humanity, we want to see it with our own eyes and share the experience of the people whose lives are turned upside down. Through the miracle of moving pictures, we are connected to the lives of people we have never met and may be moved to help them. Read More...

How Satellites Put a Better Wine in Your Glass

“Wine is nature’s magical accident,” wrote former champion jockey and mystery writer Dick Francis. We enjoy wine today because naturally occurring yeast on grapes turns the sugar within them into alcohol. For centuries, vineyard owners and winemaker have done their part, but for wine-lovers everywhere, the unsung hero is nature. Read More...

Uniting a Nation Divided by Decades of War

Communications has been the lifeblood of government since the days when news traveled no faster than a horse could ride. The World Bank issued a request for proposals in 2003 to create a communications network with an ambitious mission: to re-unite a nation whose history had left it divided, violent and poor. Read More...

Satellite Serves a Thirstier World

Climate change has focused new attention on water. As the planet warms, faster evaporation and changing weather patterns are making the dry parts of the world even dryer. Political turmoil and human migration follow, with talk of “water wars” in the places where countries share a water supply. Read More...

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