Joseph Pelton posted a discussion in Remembering Dick Tauber
In the early 1980s, still in the take-off years of satellite communications, there was the Satellite Communications Users Conference held in Denver, Colorado each summer. And at SCUC the so-called “groupies” got together informally to socialize at these and other satellite shows. A group of satellite stalwarts that included Susan Irwin, Ben Fisher (now deceased), Mack Schwing, Kim Degnan, Bucky Marshall, and others got together and in a Mexican restaurant in Denver decided to create a new satellite organization. The idea was to create a professional group open to satellite engineers, sales people, management, and other professionals such as lawyers, accountants, insurance, etc. Dick Tauber was not in that initial group of twelve, but he quickly became involved with SSPI and became the heart of those who organized the Atlanta chapter, particularly around the many SSPI members from CNN. I worked the most closely with Sid Pike who was under orders from Ted Turner was trying to get CNN into all of the countries of the world via satellite. Frankly Sid enlisted me to get Intelsat to offer annual leases of transponders for TV distribution rather than insisted on selling TV on a minute by minute basis with a ten minute minimum. Through Sid Pike I met Dick Tauber and knew he immediately he was just the right person to build up the Atlanta chapter. After I left Intelsat and moved to the University of Colorado I had less interaction with Dick Tauber but we still met up at the Annual Satellite Shows starting with the first one held in Crystal City with about 300 participants. Things have come a long ways from then to today’s shows with over 5000 participants. It was a privilege to work with Dick Tauber who was one of the truly lion’s of the satellite industry and I will miss him and the enthusiasm he brought to the satellite industry. Joseph N. Pelton, First President of the SSPI.

(From Cape Town So. Africa where I am teaching graduate students satellite engineering...
see more In the early 1980s, still in the take-off years of satellite communications, there was the Satellite Communications Users Conference held in Denver, Colorado each summer. And at SCUC the so-called “groupies” got together informally to socialize at these and other satellite shows. A group of satellite stalwarts that included Susan Irwin, Ben Fisher (now deceased), Mack Schwing, Kim Degnan, Bucky Marshall, and others got together and in a Mexican restaurant in Denver decided to create a new satellite organization. The idea was to create a professional group open to satellite engineers, sales people, management, and other professionals such as lawyers, accountants, insurance, etc. Dick Tauber was not in that initial group of twelve, but he quickly became involved with SSPI and became the heart of those who organized the Atlanta chapter, particularly around the many SSPI members from CNN. I worked the most closely with Sid Pike who was under orders from Ted Turner was trying to get CNN into all of the countries of the world via satellite. Frankly Sid enlisted me to get Intelsat to offer annual leases of transponders for TV distribution rather than insisted on selling TV on a minute by minute basis with a ten minute minimum. Through Sid Pike I met Dick Tauber and knew he immediately he was just the right person to build up the Atlanta chapter. After I left Intelsat and moved to the University of Colorado I had less interaction with Dick Tauber but we still met up at the Annual Satellite Shows starting with the first one held in Crystal City with about 300 participants. Things have come a long ways from then to today’s shows with over 5000 participants. It was a privilege to work with Dick Tauber who was one of the truly lion’s of the satellite industry and I will miss him and the enthusiasm he brought to the satellite industry. Joseph N. Pelton, First President of the SSPI.

(From Cape Town So. Africa where I am teaching graduate students satellite engineering and applications at the University of Cape Town, April 20, 2018)